Arts

 

photo of Uma Kumar

Uma Kumar

Website | Email

Dr. Uma Kumar made a significant effort to create a learning environment that would be accessible to every student regardless of their socio-economic status in her GERM 426 class by ensuring the course work readings were all made available online.

 

photo of David Gaertner

David Gaertner

Website | Email

Dr. David Gaertner is leading the way for open education in First Nations and Indigenous Studies and educating his students on the implications of open knowledge. While Open Education finds more tensions in the humanities, Dr Gaertner has embraced this dialogue within his classroom by exploring traditional knowledge licenses vs. creative commons licenses.

 

Jon Beasley-Murray

Website | Email

Dr. Jon Beasley-Murray, Assistant Professor in Latin American Studies at the University of British Columbia, co-ordinated the Wikipedia educational project ‘Murder, Madness, and Mayhem’. The collective goals were to have students write a selection of articles on Latin American literature and bring the articles to featured article status (or as near as possible). By project’s end, after just one semester, they had promoted three articles to Featured Article status, eight to Good Article status, and one to B-Class status.

 

photo of M.V. Ramana

M.V. Ramana

Website | Email

Dr. M.V. Ramana used videos, online quizzes, news sources, and many open access articles as course materials for his class. He is also an advocate for open access and open education, imparting to students the value of online materials in accessibility and assistance with learning, as well as for expanding scholarship.

Michael Byers

Website | Email

Dr. Michael Byers does not use textbooks in his class, and has created a class website with links to all course materials that he uses. He believes in open access, and using open education as a form of knowledge sharing, and is committed to eliminating course material costs for students.

photo of Andrew Owen

Andrew Owen

Website | Email

Dr. Andrew Owen understands the burden that textbook costs can place on students, and provides free and accessible course materials for his students to use. He puts in significant labour to create online educational modules with quizzes and more, meaning that course materials are not only available online, but interactive.

 

Jonathan Ichikawa

Jonathan Ichikawa

Website | Email

Dr. Jonathan Ichikawa’s text (co-authored by Dr. Magnus of SUNY Albany), forall x, was developed with significant student input and feedback through its use in PHIL 220, a large-enrolment course taken by undergraduates in many degree programs. The text forms the backbone for a course taught using pedagogy designed to engage students as they wrestle with difficult concepts during class. The success of his students in wrestling with complex topics speaks to the care taken by Dr. Ichikawa in creating and using open resources that engage successfully so many students in the study of logic.

 

Dave Gilbert

Website | Email

Dr. Dave Gilbert is currently working on a project that combines a revision to an open textbook for Logic (forallx, UBC edition by Jonathan Ichikawa) with Carnap, an open framework allowing for the development of online (in-browser) formal reasoning exercises and activities, as well as automated marking support, created by Professor Graham Leach-Krouse (Kansas State). This project will support courses that teach students to use semantic tableaux for proofs, and offers an open source, web-based application for exercises and marking support. This will allow students to save money not only on a textbook, but also on homework software that they might otherwise be asked to pay for.

Kathryn Grafton

Website | Email

Dr. Kathryn Grafton has assigned a Wikipedia project in a Canadian Studies course, providing an excellent example of how students can get involved in revising and creating open educational resources. According to the Wiki Edu dashboard for the course, 45 student editors created 6 articles and revised 29 during the course.

Ben Cheung

Website | Email

Dr. Ben Cheung has been an advocate for Open Education on campus for many years. He uses open textbooks in his class, contributes to open literature, and raises awareness for OER implementation across campus. In Dr. Cheung’s own words: “Not only is this open textbook comparable to others in terms of quality, but it also gives me more freedom and control as an educator over what goes into the course and what students take away from the instruction.”

 

 

photo of Azim Shariff

Azim Shariff

Website | Email

Dr. Azim Shariff has used an open resources (including quizzes from the Noba Projec) rather than a paid textbook with the 225 students section of Psych102.

Simon Lolliot

Website | Email

Dr. Simon Lolliot has been an early adopter of using open textbooks rather than paid textbooks in multiple yearsof the courses he teaches. His use of OERs has had a huge impact and cost saving for students (including eliminating textbook fees for more than 800 students one year).

 

 

photo of Steven Barnes

Steven Barnes

Website | Email

Dr. Steven Barnes has long been an advocate of making education accessible. He has removed barriers to learning materials by using open textbooks in his courses in place of paid textbooks, he has created open online courses, and pioneered open technologies to support open pedagogy and OER development.

 

photo of Siobhán McElduff

Siobhán McElduff

Website | Email

Dr. Siobhán McElduff is engaged in open pedagogy through the creation of open resources with her students, including a reader co-produced with students as part of her course on socially stigmatized groups in ancient Rome.

 

photo of Siobhán McPhee

Siobhán McPhee

Website | Email

Dr. Siobhán McPhee works with open and emerging technologies, such as creating augmented reality apps for her courses or engaging her students in creating open resources, to expand the boundaries of education.”I see education as the ultimate equalizer,” she said. “Open is about that ability to take education as it was in the past–a very elitist idea–and making it available to anyone who wants it.”