Science

Andrew Rechnitzer

Website | Email

Dr. Andrew Rechnitzer is one of the three faculty members in Mathematics behind the CLP series of free online texts used by thousands of UBC students every year. These top-quality resources are the primary references in the 4-stage calculus sequence MATH 100, 101, 200, 317. The authors prepared them on their own initiative, out of love for the subject and compassion for students, with no thought of recognition and virtually no resources from UBC.

Dr. Rechnitzer is an early adopter and creator of open textbooks at UBC. He has replaced paid textbooks in the courses that he teaches and is one of the authors of the CLP open calculus textbooks. He also advocates and develops innovative open source platforms for marking and assessment that saves fees for students.
Screen reader support enabled.

Joel Feldman

Joel Feldman

Website | Email

Dr. Joel Feldman is one of the Math department’s senior leaders and one of the three faculty members in Mathematics behind the CLP series of free online texts used by thousands of UBC students every year. These top-quality resources are the primary references in the 4-stage calculus sequence MATH 100, 101, 200, 317. The authors prepared them on their own initiative, out of love for the subject and compassion for students, with no thought of recognition and virtually no resources from UBC.

Elyse Yeager

Elyse Yeager

Website | Email

Dr. Elyse Yeager is one of the three faculty members in Mathematics behind the CLP series of free online texts used by thousands of UBC students every year. These top-quality resources are the primary references in the 4-stage calculus sequence MATH 100, 101, 200, 317. The authors prepared them on their own initiative, out of love for the subject and compassion for students, with no thought of recognition and virtually no resources from UBC.

Leah Keshet

Leah Keshet

Website | Email

Dr. Leah Keshet has written two textbooks for first- and second-semester calculus for the life sciences. This textbook has been used in MATH 102 for three years now, with a yearly enrolment of about 1,000 students. With the text in a fairly stable, finalized state, she spent last summer engaging recent Math 102 alumni, leading undergraduate students through developing even more open resources, including homework problems and solutions.

photo of Eric Cytrynbaum

Eric Cytrynbaum

Website | Email

Dr. Eric Cytrynbaum has been in charge of MATH 102, and has set up the entire course to run on open content. Along with using his colleague Dr. Leah Keshet’s textbook, Dr. Cytrynbaum developed a large selection of open-ended homework problems, drawing on his background in mathematical biology to connect pure mathematics with relevant applications. He has also adopted the free homework system WeBWork and carefully curating a course wiki to provide openly-accessible materials to students.

Seckin Demirbas

Seckin Demirbas

Website | Email

Dr. Demirbas is currently working on a free Introduction to Proofs textbook, for Math 200, together with Andrew Rechnitzer, a course which has several hundred enrollees each year.

photo of Reid Holmes

Reid Holmes

Website | Email

Dr. Reid Holmes has done outstanding research into teaching application-based software development for many years, including using OERSon a a publicly available github page.

Dr. Dragos Ghioca has adopted only CLP open textbooks in his math courses, and takes an active role in pointing students to free-accessible studying resources.

photo of Stefan Reinsberg

Stefan Reinsberg

Website | Email

Dr. Stefan Reinsberg worked with colleagues to adapt an Open Stax Physics textbook that they put into an edX site for a first-year physics course. They not only saved students money by doing so, but also customized the book to better fit the course. Stefan was one of the authors of a research study on student perceptions and use of the open textbook for that course: The Adoption of an Open Textbook in a Large Physics Course: An Analysis of Cost, Outcomes, Use and Perceptions (International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 2017).

Georg Rieger

Georg Rieger

Website | Email

Dr. Georg Rieger worked with colleagues to adapt an Open Stax Physics textbook that they put into an edX site for a first-year physics course. They not only saved students money by doing so, but also customized the book to better fit the course. Stefan was one of the authors of a research study on student perceptions and use of the open textbook for that course: The Adoption of an Open Textbook in a Large Physics Course: An Analysis of Cost, Outcomes, Use and Perceptions (International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 2017).

Jaclyn Stewart

Jaclyn Stewart

Website | Email

Dr. Jaclyn Stewart has involved students in adapting material from several open textbooks for chemistry to create a new open textbook for an organic chemistry course, which will be published on the Pressbooks platform.

Marcello Pavan

Website | Email

Dr. Pavan is an early adopter of using open textbooks in his PHYS100 courses – he had used open textbooks in place of paid textbooks for several years.

Gregor Kiczales

Website | Email

Prof. Kiczales has long been a champion of using open and freely accessible learning materials at UBC. In his courses, he has always used an open educational resources including an open textbook and, more recently, he has had developed open access MOOCs, and used those open materials in his courses. According to Prof. Kiczales “In education, open means learners won’t have to pay for the materials, and it means that instructors can build on each other’s work to create better and better learning.”

photo of Roland Stull

Roland Stull

Website | Email

Dr. Stull is a longtime creator and user of open resources in his teaching. His open textbook, Practical Meteorology, was one of the earliest open textbooks created and used at UBC as well as many other institutions. Dr. Stull also teaches ATSC113 a distance education course, which is almost entirely open.

image of Russ Algar

Russ Algar

Website | Email

Dr. Algar is a long time user of open resources. He has implemented an open textbook in his Chemistry course and co-developed the Alchemy online teaching and learning tool, which is open access at UBC.

photo of Simon Bates

Simon Bates

Website | Email

As both an instructor and as the Associate Provost, Teaching & Learning, Dr. Simon Bates has been a huge leader and supporter of open resources at UBC-V. He has used open textbooks in his courses, created open problem libraries to share assessment materials, and has engaged in open assignments and projects in which his students created valuable learning resources. More so, he has championed polices and funding support for open education that has helped make “open” a strong practice at UBC.

photo of Patrick Walls

Patrick Walls

Website | Email

Dr. Patrick Walls uses open resources in his teaching and has supported the use of Jupyter Notebooks, an open-source web application that assists in the sharing of open resources that contain live code, equations, visualizations and narrative text, at UBC.

Cristina Conati

Website | Email

Prof. Conati teaches CPSC322 which uses a freely available online textbook and openly licensed site with resources rather than paid materials.

Giuseppe Carenini

Website | Email

Prof. Carenini teaches several courses that use freely available online textbook and open resources rather than paid materials.

Alan Mackworth

Website | Email

Prof. Mackworth has created a free online textbook as well as a site full of related openly licensed resources (AIspace.org). These freely available materials are used to teach Artificial Intelligence across several courses at UBC.

David Poole

Website | Email

Prof. Poole has created a free online textbook as well as a site full of related openly licensed resources (AIspace.org). These freely available materials are used to teach Artificial Intelligence across several courses at UBC.